Author Topic: Good Time (2017, Safdie brothers)  (Read 114 times)

Offline fizz

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Good Time (2017, Safdie brothers)
« on: January 20, 2018, 11:47:PM »


Good Time can be described in one word - Desperate. From its opening heist all the way to the events that leads to the electrifyingly tense closing moments, the sense of desperation is evident in everything Connie (Robert Pattinson, utterly mesmerising) does for his brother. As a story it exemplifies the old adage that crime doesn't pay, but has a sense of tenderness underneath the cruelty. Employing a 70's grit (NY has never looked so unglamorous), 80's synth music and the best Robert Pattison performance ever....the film feels like an unholy combination of the best of Dog Day Afternoon and After Hours.

Like those films, the setup is simple, the execution clever. In order to free his brother from prison and assemble enough Bond Cash, Pattison convinced me he would go anywhere and do anything. Building on top of one clever unpredictable situation after another, the film has a contemporary energy that carries it through to the very end. But if Good Time's energy is derived from its long, nighty chase, its heart can be found in the two tender scenes featuring Connie's mentally challenged brother that bookend the film - clearly ensuring that the film is more than just a visceral thrill. Remarkably unforgiving and utterly unforgettable.

Rating: 5/5
Narrative is the poison of cinema...There's nothing more beautiful than elusiveness in cinema.

Offline fizz

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Re: Good Time (2017, Safdie brothers)
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2018, 11:52:PM »
And once you've seen this brilliant, urban masterpiece (not before), take a look at this music video - directed by the brothers as a sort of sequel to the film (if you get what it's about) featuring that haunting song by Iggy Pop that comes up at just the right time.

Narrative is the poison of cinema...There's nothing more beautiful than elusiveness in cinema.