Author Topic: IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)  (Read 207 times)

Offline fizz

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IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)
« on: September 10, 2017, 11:29:PM »


Another film and another TV comparison. I'm not even much of a TV follower but even I will confess that the good stuff on the idiot box seems to be beating their brethren on the big screen. It is a beloved novel. Not nearly the best by author Stephen King, but epic due to its length. I only vaguely remember it, but some of it has been embedded in my memory for life -- like the classic tongue twister that stuttering Bill likes to utter "He thrusts his fists against the post, but still insist he see the ghosts" (which appears, if you listen intently, thrice in the film, fleetingly so). The film is a good, though not great adaptation because I couldn't help but think of and compare it to something better (and more evolved, self-aware and post modern) like Netflix's seminal Stranger Things.

Unlike Stranger Things, It earns points for not relying solely on nostalgia, admirably trying to create its own waking nightmare out of a summer of early teen bonding, emancipation from parental control and facing your proverbial and literal inner demons. Perhaps because this is just half the story, it's only about half as engaging as the book. In the source, the story really develops over 2 time periods, whereas here we just get to see one-half of it. The after effect on some of the kids is foreshadowed (if you've read the book you'll probably understand why the focuses on certain key characters or traits, like the cowardice of the Jewish kid), and with the success of this film, hopefully, we'll come to see it full circle. While the film does a lot of its own universe building (I don't remember much of the book since I probably read it a couple of decades ago myself) I wish however that the film had been truer to some of the monsters that the kids see It manifest into, like werewolves for e.g. (but this probably did not happen due to the complication with movie rights). What we do see is sometimes effective, but, as others have commented, this is not true horror, it's gory, bloody, often gruesome, like a lot of King work, but it rarely gets into your head (say like how the recent masterful It Comes At Night did). In horror, almost always, less is more and the more appearances Pennywise made, the less engaging or even scary he becomes (which made his opening act masterful by comparison to what we see at the end). This is also in part due to the book, where the creature is really described to be metaphysical and alien. The film thankfully doesn't go there (it doesn't work entirely in the book either) but I think more could have been done to really branch off and create something inventively new. Still, this is a wonderfully effective studio produced/backed/big-budgeted horror film. Not the best this year - for that look at either the afore mentioned It comes at night or even Get Out both merely disguised as horror films but being so much more, which is perhaps why they work so well too!

Rating: 3.5/5
Narrative is the poison of cinema...There's nothing more beautiful than elusiveness in cinema.

Offline shariqq

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Re: IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2017, 12:16:AM »
--HERE LIE SPOILERS--

(which made his opening act masterful by comparison to what we see at the end).

That opening scene was expertly done, the build up followed by the horrifying payoff was excellent.

I agree with what you about Pennywise. He became less scary as the movie went on. Doesn't help either that the clown does absurd things that make little sense basically allowing the kids to escape. This brought their threat level to near-zero, hence non-scary. For example, in the projection room scene, why does he disappear when the shutter is opened? He ain't scared of sunlight. Or why the catatonic shaking while running to a kid sometimes, and not at other times. The movie doesn't seem to create any rules to follow. It just wants to shock to scare, rather than creep and terrify. I found the adults in the movie way more horrific.

But my complains are mostly just with Pennywise. Apart from him, everything else about the movie was quite well handled -- the camaraderie of the kids, the bully's side-story, and even the way the movie handled how the kids dealt with situations. The humour was mostly spot-on, especially Finn Wolfhard (the kid who also appears in Stranger Things) does a splendid job of timing his one-liners.

Classified as "horror", which the marketing of the movie emphasises, the movie isn't nearly as great. But as a kid's horror-adventure, the movie really finds its groove and excels. Think E.T., but with a Killer Clown. Instead of saving ET from the Adults and sending him home, the kids have to save themselves and the town from Pennywise and send him away/kill him.

The way the movie ends, the announcement of Chapter 2 is imminent. I'd watch It.

My Rating --> 3.5 out of 5
Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here. That's - that's just an awful feeling. -- Elijah Price,  Unbreakable (2000)

Offline fizz

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Re: IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2017, 12:19:AM »
It will be interesting to see who plays who as adults. Here is what the kids said (from the IMDB trivia pages):

Quote
The cast of the Losers Club were asked whom they wanted to play their adult parts: Finn Wolfhard (Richie Tozier) says Bill Hader, Sophia Lillis (Beverly Marsh) says Jessica Chastain, Chosen Jacobs (Mike Hanlon) says Chadwick Boseman, Jack Dylan Grazer (Eddie Kaspbrak) says Jake Gyllenhaal, Wyatt Oleff (Stanley Uris) says Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Jeremy Ray Taylor (Ben Hanscom) says Chris Pratt and Jaeden Lieberher (Bill Denbrough) says Christian Bale.
Narrative is the poison of cinema...There's nothing more beautiful than elusiveness in cinema.

Offline fizz

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Re: IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2017, 12:24:AM »
I also agree with you that the film had no rules (and therefore no discipline). Some scenes were silly/strange - like that projection scene but also the library moment, with the headless burnt kid. The shaky movement was distracting. It seemed the director was really limited by an inability to shoot anything new that was truly horrific. That scene with all those clowns in a room was so...cliche. And in the first act when each kid meets his/her fear manifested by It, the transition between scenes was painful. But on the whole, while I have very little expectation from big budget horror films in general (I'm looking at you Conjuring 2) this was still watchable and good, mostly for the kids. I think more than E.T., the film is a toned down version of King's very own Stand by Me especially with the bully angle. This film doesn't come nearly close to that classic however so don't mistake that comparison.
Narrative is the poison of cinema...There's nothing more beautiful than elusiveness in cinema.

Offline shariqq

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Re: IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2017, 12:31:AM »
I think more than E.T., the film is a toned down version of King's very own Stand by Me especially with the bully angle. This film doesn't come nearly close to that classic however so don't mistake that comparison.

Yes, I didn't mean in quality when comparing. I should probably have used Super 8 as an example, knowing your love for the movie ;)

Yes, that editing was weird. Even the part where they kids see the three doors, the friends I watched the movie with didn't understand which door they opened and why Pennywise stopped when they did open the door -- I guess we watch enough movies to make that leap in guessing/getting things.

I haven't watched Stand by Me. Putting it on the list.
Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here. That's - that's just an awful feeling. -- Elijah Price,  Unbreakable (2000)

Offline shariqq

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Re: IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2017, 01:11:AM »
It will be interesting to see who plays who as adults. Here is what the kids said (from the IMDB trivia pages):

Quote
The cast of the Losers Club were asked whom they wanted to play their adult parts: Finn Wolfhard (Richie Tozier) says Bill Hader, Sophia Lillis (Beverly Marsh) says Jessica Chastain, Chosen Jacobs (Mike Hanlon) says Chadwick Boseman, Jack Dylan Grazer (Eddie Kaspbrak) says Jake Gyllenhaal, Wyatt Oleff (Stanley Uris) says Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Jeremy Ray Taylor (Ben Hanscom) says Chris Pratt and Jaeden Lieberher (Bill Denbrough) says Christian Bale.


Some of these are very good choices. Bill Hader, Jessica Chastain and Chris Pratt are particularly very good wish-casting!

I made a quick-reference for the child actors and their preferred adult stars in image form, for easier to co-relate:


Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here. That's - that's just an awful feeling. -- Elijah Price,  Unbreakable (2000)

Offline fizz

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Re: IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2017, 10:26:PM »
That's a great pic. You can create a mini-post on the main Filmphoria site based on this....
Narrative is the poison of cinema...There's nothing more beautiful than elusiveness in cinema.

Offline kaytee

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Re: IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2017, 12:46:PM »
The girl is a dead ringer for Kristen Wigg, when I saw her first on screen I immediately went to Kristen Wigg looks really young here.

TEJA mein hoon, Mark idhar hai !!

Offline shariqq

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Re: IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)
« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2017, 09:38:PM »
For HISHE fans.

Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here. That's - that's just an awful feeling. -- Elijah Price,  Unbreakable (2000)

Offline shariqq

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Re: IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)
« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2018, 11:13:PM »
Jessica Chastain has actually been cast! AndBill Hader is in talks too. James McAvoy is in talks for Bill, the character that was dream-cast with Christian Bale by the child-actor.

That's:
Confirmed: 1 of 7
In Talks: 2 of 7
No News: 4 of 7

Updated image:

Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here. That's - that's just an awful feeling. -- Elijah Price,  Unbreakable (2000)

Offline fizz

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Re: IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)
« Reply #10 on: April 27, 2018, 05:15:PM »
People will want to watch this for casting alone!

And for that reason I hope this happens (and hopefully improves on the mediocre first part)
Narrative is the poison of cinema...There's nothing more beautiful than elusiveness in cinema.

Offline shariqq

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Re: IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)
« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2018, 11:44:PM »
One James Ransone has been cast to play Eddie Kaspbrak, the hypochondriac.

That's:
Confirmed: 2 of 7
In Talks: 2 of 7
No News: 3 of 7

Updated image:

« Last Edit: May 18, 2018, 05:30:PM by shariqq »
Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here. That's - that's just an awful feeling. -- Elijah Price,  Unbreakable (2000)

Offline shariqq

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Re: IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)
« Reply #12 on: May 18, 2018, 05:30:PM »
More casting. Andy Bean has been cast to play the jew boy Stan Uris.

That's:
Confirmed: 3 of 7
In Talks: 2 of 7
No News: 2 of 7

Updated image:

Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here. That's - that's just an awful feeling. -- Elijah Price,  Unbreakable (2000)

Offline fizz

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Re: IT (Andrés Muschietti, 2017)
« Reply #13 on: August 20, 2018, 02:27:AM »
So McAvoy and Haider are officially in...
Narrative is the poison of cinema...There's nothing more beautiful than elusiveness in cinema.