Author Topic: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)  (Read 862 times)

Offline ozzylogic

  • wm citizen
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 3632
  • Coppertop
Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« on: May 08, 2017, 09:05:PM »
New trailer:

"I hate to disappoint you, but rubber lips are immune to your charms."

Offline kaytee

  • wm citizen
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 6182
  • TEJA mein hoon, Mark idhar hai !!
Re: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2017, 10:50:AM »
Boner alert.

Time to revisit the original.
TEJA mein hoon, Mark idhar hai !!

Offline shariqq

  • Administrator
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 8253
  • You never know...
    • Filmphoria
Re: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2017, 11:48:PM »
Essential viewing, official shorts that take place between in the timeline between the original and the sequel:

1) Black Out 2022



2) 2036: Nexus Dawn



3) 2048: Nowhere to Run
Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here. That's - that's just an awful feeling. -- Elijah Price,  Unbreakable (2000)

Offline fizz

  • Administrator
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 4897
Re: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2017, 03:05:PM »
Saw the first 2 when they came out earlier this month. Pretty good, but the third, from the director of Cowboy Bebop (and one or two of the Animatrix shorts as well), is the standout.

BTW...the first 2 are directed by Jake Scott, Ridley's son, who also did the official shorts for Alien: Covenant earlier this year.
Narrative is the poison of cinema...There's nothing more beautiful than elusiveness in cinema.

Offline shariqq

  • Administrator
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 8253
  • You never know...
    • Filmphoria
Re: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2017, 03:08:PM »
but the third, from the director of Cowboy Bebop (and one or two of the Animatrix shorts as well), is the standout.

Yeah, agree. Right from the beginning, it reminded me of the first Animatrix which was also about humans abusing Robots and rioting. Such a great piece this too.
Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here. That's - that's just an awful feeling. -- Elijah Price,  Unbreakable (2000)

Offline fizz

  • Administrator
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 4897
Re: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2017, 03:16:PM »
but the third, from the director of Cowboy Bebop (and one or two of the Animatrix shorts as well), is the standout.

Yeah, agree. Right from the beginning, it reminded me of the first Animatrix which was also about humans abusing Robots and rioting. Such a great piece this too.

Little details...

The white dove. Shattered glass flying around a dying Replicant.

Gaff. Fucking Gaff and his walking stick.

And the music. Oh, the glorious music.
Narrative is the poison of cinema...There's nothing more beautiful than elusiveness in cinema.

Offline shariqq

  • Administrator
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 8253
  • You never know...
    • Filmphoria
Re: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2017, 03:23:PM »
but the third, from the director of Cowboy Bebop (and one or two of the Animatrix shorts as well), is the standout.

Yeah, agree. Right from the beginning, it reminded me of the first Animatrix which was also about humans abusing Robots and rioting. Such a great piece this too.
Gaff. Fucking Gaff and his walking stick.

Hehe, yeah it was so awesome to see him in it! I so wished they had an origami in that shot too -- it would be fan service... but it would be fluff fun, especially since his 3 Origamis in Blade Runner each is so purposeful. Therefore in hindisight I'm more appreciative of the way it exactly was.
Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here. That's - that's just an awful feeling. -- Elijah Price,  Unbreakable (2000)

Offline fizz

  • Administrator
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 4897
Re: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2017, 03:26:PM »
Btw...you can buy those (re-created) origami on the bay.


Narrative is the poison of cinema...There's nothing more beautiful than elusiveness in cinema.

Offline shariqq

  • Administrator
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 8253
  • You never know...
    • Filmphoria
Re: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2017, 03:29:PM »
Btw, I'm thinking the whole NX-8 serial number in the right eye-ball will somehow be a part of the movie too.
I'm also fascinated why Wallace has kept Tyrell Corp's nomenclature with the Replicants. After the Tyrell Corp's last Nexus 8, Wallace's test Replicant (from the second short) is also a Nexus 8. Interesting.
Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here. That's - that's just an awful feeling. -- Elijah Price,  Unbreakable (2000)

Offline fizz

  • Administrator
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 4897
Re: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2017, 03:43:PM »
Btw, I'm thinking the whole NX-8 serial number in the right eye-ball will somehow be a part of the movie too.

Exactly what I thought...there is some significance to it. Never seen or read/heard of it before. It's similar to the numbers on the snake scale from the original....
Narrative is the poison of cinema...There's nothing more beautiful than elusiveness in cinema.

Offline fizz

  • Administrator
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 4897
Re: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2017, 10:53:PM »
The official timeline of events between the two films in bullet points from the studio.

Shariqq, it addresses the ocular identification technique we discussed:

Quote

2018
After a bloody mutiny by a Nexus 6 combat team in an Off-world colony, Replicants are declared illegal on Earth — under penalty of death.

2019
A prototype Replicant, Rachael, and Officer Rick Deckard, a Blade runner, escape Los Angeles together.

2020
After the death of founder Eldon Tyrell, the Tyrell Corporation rushes a new line of Nexus 8 Replicants onto the market for use Off-world. Ulike previous Nexus models, built with 4-year lifespans, the Nexus 8s have open-ended lifespans, as well as ocular implants for easy identification

2022 The Blackout
An EMP of unknown origin detonates somewhere in the West Coast. Cities are shut down for weeks. Electronic data is corrupted or destroyed over most of the United States. Finance and trade markets crash worldwide. Food supplies become dire. Theories spread as to the cause of the Blackout; none are proven. The most popular blame Replicants.

2023 Replicant Prohibition
The governing authorities legislate an indefinite “prohibition” on replicant production. Nexus 6 models are now all decommissioned due to their programmed 4-year lifespans. Surviving Nexus 8 models are to be retired. Those that can, go into hiding.

2025
Idealistic scientist Niander Wallace pioneers advancements in genetically modified food and shares his patents for free, marking an end to a global crisis. His company, Wallace Corporation, E&C, expands across the globe — and into the Off-world colonies.

2028
Niander Wallace acquires the remains of the bankrupt Tyrell Corporation.

2030s
Niander Wallace improves upon Tyrells’ genetic engineering and memory implantation methods to make replicants obedient and controllable.

2036
Prohibition is repealed. Wallace reintroduces a new line of “perfected” Replicants — The Nexus 9.

Early 2040s
The LAPD commits additional resources to bolster its existing Blade Runner unit, tasked with locating illegal Replicants and retiring them.

2048


2049
When we return to Los Angeles, 30 years after the original movie, climate change has caused the sea level to rise dramatically. A massive Sea Wall has been built along the Sepulveda Pass to protect the Los Angeles basin. Los Aneles is even more uninhabitable than before and filled with poverty and sickness. Humans, who were not well enough to leave for the off-world colonies are left behind. There is no fresh food, and inhabitants survive on Wallace’s genetically modified food products sold from vending machines at street markets.
Narrative is the poison of cinema...There's nothing more beautiful than elusiveness in cinema.

Offline shariqq

  • Administrator
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 8253
  • You never know...
    • Filmphoria
Re: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« Reply #11 on: October 01, 2017, 12:31:AM »
Wow, fantastic.

So Rachel is a prototype, not defined as a Nexus 6. Therefore it is likely she had an open-ended lifespan.
Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here. That's - that's just an awful feeling. -- Elijah Price,  Unbreakable (2000)

Offline shariqq

  • Administrator
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 8253
  • You never know...
    • Filmphoria
Re: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« Reply #12 on: October 06, 2017, 06:17:PM »
--HERE LIE SPOILERS--

So Rachel is a prototype, not defined as a Nexus 6. Therefore it is likely she had an open-ended lifespan.

How true did that turn out!


I'm still processing, but my initial reaction is that I like it very much! It isn't flawless, the most obvious one being what fizz mentioned about the score. And I have a few questions about what happens that I want to think about.

But this is as good a Blade Runner I think anyone could have ever hoped for. By going for a much bigger scale, visually and in-story implications, the film not just re-emphasizes the primary question of the original (what really is to be human) but also adds the variables of evolution & identity. I also absolutely LOVED how this movie uses the same religious parallels of creator-creation like the original did.

More when I have thought about it more (which will lead to more details to stand out), but for now, what a fantastic addition (and implications due) to the Origami collection: A sheep!  =D>
Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here. That's - that's just an awful feeling. -- Elijah Price,  Unbreakable (2000)

Offline shariqq

  • Administrator
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 8253
  • You never know...
    • Filmphoria
Re: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« Reply #13 on: October 06, 2017, 06:18:PM »
Also, in my mind, though I had always read the first movie that way, now I'm convinced that Deckard is a replicant.
Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here. That's - that's just an awful feeling. -- Elijah Price,  Unbreakable (2000)

Offline fizz

  • Administrator
  • alfred hitchcock
  • *****
  • Posts: 4897
Re: Blade Runner 2049 (Dennis Villeneuve, 2017)
« Reply #14 on: October 06, 2017, 07:16:PM »

Sly, somber and serious, Blade Runner 2049 is an apt continuation and expansion of the universe created by the original Blade Runner, a cult classic sci-fi film that came out 35 years ago and has had fans, detractors and those in the middle debating about whether its protagonist Deckard (Harrison Ford) was a Replicant or not ever since. Don't worry; the sequel understands the appeal of leaving this an unresolved enigma, as it does while creating more intrigue from the new setup.

This film is based 30 years after the events of the first, where a new Blade Runner, Officer K (Ryan Gosling) discovers, while on a routine mission hunting rogue Replicants, something that has the potential to alter the very fabric of the delicate society where Replicants and humans co-exist but also raise questions about what he knows about himself and his own existence. Saying anything more is not allowed. Not only because the media screening I attended had stern instructions from distributors not to, but also because part of the films huge joy is discovering its secrets, which start from about the five-minute mark and continue all the way up to the end, nearly 2 and a half hours later. Fear not, the running time doesn't feel exhaustive in any way, in fact, its epic, full of beautiful, flavoursome visuals - from the neon-lit, cyberpunk LA that's strewn with piles of garbage, like the Earth from Wall-E, to the rusty orange of an irradiated Las Vegas. Thank DP Roger Deakins for this, who does some of his finest work by immersing us into this eye-popping dystopia.

K's discovery (which shall remain unnamed), leads to him remaining in a bewildered state of confusion and self-doubt for a large duration of the film, similar to how Deckard felt when he found himself pondering about who he was. His questions about what he knows (or doesn't) anticipate those of the audiences. The film makes you think you know where it's headed and then toys with this expectation to very surprising, at times poignant, effect. The lack of a real antagonist (Jared Leto’s blind industrialist Niander Wallace comes close) prevents the film from matching the presence of Rutger Hauer’s seminal Roy Batty but Denis Villeneuve’s spectacularly vivid direction (following his best work in the sci-fi classic Arrival) make up for this minor flaw. The script, attributed to Hampton Fincher, who also wrote the original, and Michael Green, coming off his recent acclaim as the writer of the iconic Logan, is simple yet outrageously inventive about ideas related to machines and their potential.

Respectful of the source material, it majestically both builds and deconstructs it in simple yet audacious ways. Questions about the reality of our memories replace those of dreams while the concerns of holographic companions replace the concerns of Replicants. It is so ingeniously plotted that even the late involvement of Deckard into the plot never gives away the film's position of who he really might be. Blade Runner 2049 may not provide the ultimate answer to the question of whether Deckard dreams of electronic sheep, but by the time the credits roll, you realize it doesn’t need to.

Rating: 4.5/5
Narrative is the poison of cinema...There's nothing more beautiful than elusiveness in cinema.