Author Topic: Leviathan (Thomas Hobbes, 1651)  (Read 204 times)

Offline madali

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Leviathan (Thomas Hobbes, 1651)
« on: July 28, 2013, 08:40:PM »
Leviathan (Thomas Hobbes, 1651)

"And I believe that scarce anything can be more absurdly said in natural philosophy than that which now is called Aristotle's Metaphysics; nor more repugnant to government than much of that he hath said in his Politics, nor more ignorantly, than a great part of his Ethics."

"I have already sufficiently proved (Chapter eighteen) that all governments, which men are bound to obey, are simple and absolute. In monarchy there is but one man supreme, and all other men that have any kind of power in the state have it by his commission, during his pleasure, and execute it in his name; and in aristocracy and democracy, but one supreme assembly, with the same power that in monarchy belongeth to the monarch, which is not a mixed, but an absolute sovereignty. And of the three sorts, which is the best is not to be disputed where any one of them is already established; but the present ought always to be preferred, maintained, and accounted best, because it is against both the law of nature and the divine positive law to do anything tending to the subversion thereof."


3/5
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Offline X

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Re: Leviathan (Thomas Hobbes, 1651)
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2013, 12:35:AM »
Hobbes' ideas are antiquated and I find that his political philosophy only served the vested interests of the King. He would no doubt be a huge hit in the Gulf if he were alive today...

However, Hobbes ideas on free will and determinism are still worth reading, in my opinion.

Offline madali

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Re: Leviathan (Thomas Hobbes, 1651)
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2013, 01:35:AM »
Whats most interesting is that he tries to clearly defends his ideas. The East needs to learn that.
I'd love to change the world / But I don't know what to do / So I'll leave it up to you